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The good on Twitter...

There is a lot of negativity on Twitter and other social media platforms right now, thanks to the change of power in the US, and controversial appointments to high-level government positions.  This will not be a political rant... I am choosing to focus, instead, on the good things I've seen on Twitter today.
This tweet from @cashjim led me to wouldyourathermath.com, and though I haven't taught mathematics in years, as a science teacher, mathematics still crops up in some topics so I thought I'd explore.

In particular, I like this one on statistics and thought before I used it with students, maybe I should review (or actually learn for the first time) what a boxplot is.  I did a statistics course in my third year at university, but what I remember most from that class is statistical tests (like ANOVA) and the fact that our "cheat sheet" cue card got progressively larger for each successive test/exam.

I found this explanation on how to construct, with examples, and how the boxplot can be used to compare data... actually quite useful in a scientific context, too.  Thank you, Statistics Canada!  Not only did I learn about another way my students can analyse experimental data, I also learned how to embed a Tweet in my blog... but it helped that I still remember something about HTML programming.


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